Alex Underhill
Walsall College Student
Graphic Design

Graphic design is about communication. It encompasses language, imagery, sound and many other mediums to make communication as relevant and clear as possible. Everything is designed, from the logo for that show you’re watching on TV to the image on your t-shirt. It’s important to me because if I didn’t take it seriously, or any other designers didn’t, then the effectiveness of vast communication in today’s world would be flawed.

Graphic design is about communication. It encompasses language, imagery, sound and many other mediums to make communication as relevant and clear as possible. Everything is designed, from the logo for that show you’re watching on TV to the image on your t-shirt. It’s important to me because if I didn’t take it seriously, or any other designers didn’t, then the effectiveness of vast communication in today’s world would be flawed.

This is kind of the same thing as the F1 magazine, with the small descriptions and page numbers - but relevant images and the pages they feature larger.
This magazine also features something before the contents page that I have put in because there was quite a lot of empty space. It’s a letter/note from the editor, outlining the issue and talking about any competitions or new features that may be available. Looking at these layouts though, I don’t think it would be needed if I made better use of the space in the first place.

This is kind of the same thing as the F1 magazine, with the small descriptions and page numbers - but relevant images and the pages they feature larger.

This magazine also features something before the contents page that I have put in because there was quite a lot of empty space. It’s a letter/note from the editor, outlining the issue and talking about any competitions or new features that may be available. Looking at these layouts though, I don’t think it would be needed if I made better use of the space in the first place.

I’m looking at contents pages. I’ve got all my house style rules, one of my articles is finished so now I can start applying them to he others. I haven’t got far left with my digital mag either.
I’ve had the contents for the digital version done for ages, and I’ve been wondering how to lay it out in the print version. At the minute, it’s pretty much a carbon copy of the digital, but that makes me think I’m working backwards. Seeing as the digital side is to accompany the magazine, its needs to be an extension of the print version and not the other way around.
This is from F1 magazine. 
I like the layout of relevant pictures on the right page of the spread but I don’t really like the full bleed. Everything in the issue is listed to the left with example spreads there too. 
This is more like what I feel I need in my magazine. At the minute the numbers and pictures are taking up way too much space. I’m going to reduce the size of numbers and headings to make it seem more like a magazine than a leaflet, and play around with the layout of the images.

I’m looking at contents pages. I’ve got all my house style rules, one of my articles is finished so now I can start applying them to he others. I haven’t got far left with my digital mag either.

I’ve had the contents for the digital version done for ages, and I’ve been wondering how to lay it out in the print version. At the minute, it’s pretty much a carbon copy of the digital, but that makes me think I’m working backwards. Seeing as the digital side is to accompany the magazine, its needs to be an extension of the print version and not the other way around.

This is from F1 magazine. 

I like the layout of relevant pictures on the right page of the spread but I don’t really like the full bleed. Everything in the issue is listed to the left with example spreads there too. 

This is more like what I feel I need in my magazine. At the minute the numbers and pictures are taking up way too much space. I’m going to reduce the size of numbers and headings to make it seem more like a magazine than a leaflet, and play around with the layout of the images.

These are the works of Steve Wilson. His artistic style is extremely bold and vivid, but its style could be used with any number of colour palettes, textures, and mediums.

It’s similar to the fluid style of Naar Inkt Vissen (Fishing for Ink) which I looked at earlier with the curved shapes and soft edges, but high contrast. It’s also similar to the pop-art reminiscent work of Vincent Garcia Morilla.

Overall, it’s a mix of the two.

It encapsulates what I think the magazine represents, in terms of it’s serious messages with an almost playful twist of adding art into the mix. I like how it can be detailed even when drawn in this style.

From these, I think I have my style of illustration. Soft, neat edges, maybe even slightly geometric in its construction. Plus, I feel it would work with a variety of typefaces as it would not sit in the middle of sans-serif and serif when you tried to place it with text. Contrast would work with in with either font type.

These are works by designer Vincent Garcia Morillo.

The first image is the one I originally found on D&AD. It was for a magazine called Soirée Graphique. It was a drawing he’d done 10 years earlier and re-touched to see how his experiences and learning had affected his ability to design. 

I searched the magazine in Google to find the designer and went to his site to look through his portfolio. It was here that I saw his unique style. It’s almost a mix of pop art and etching. 

It’s really clean and fluent and I think it’s a really good way of working.

In terms of the other stuff I’ve looked at, I think it suits the styles of the mag and it’s tone of voice. 

His business card seems to be an almost quieter version of his usual style. The embossing helps to make it different.

It’s deifinitely a style I could see draped across a double page spread with a single heading and small footer or subheading to accompany it.

This is a book created by Dutch company Today Designers. It translates to ‘Fishing for Ink’. The entire book was printed using squid ink and silk screens.

The illustrations are in a unique style. They’re abstract and surreal. But they do differ throughout the book.

The first is a casual style that I don’t think would really work. The only way it relates to what I’ve already looked at is that there is hatching to indicate tone which gives a similar rough texture to some of the photography I’ve looked at.

The second I think would be a good style of illustration for Silo because it’s not completely serious, but is   It would also go with the block colours I’ve used for my borders and Index.

There was no illustrator specified for the designs, but from a video and pictures of their staff on their webpage, I know one of the illustrators is a guy called Robbert Smit, although I couldn’t find any work of his outside of Today Designers.

This work is by Laurence Haskell.

It’s completely black and white, but it still has the same kind of rough and faded texture.

Again, I think this is a style that would suit the magazine simply because of its slight contrast with my style.

This is some photography by Dan Tobin Smith.

The first is a piece for Honda. The colour style is similar to that of David Stewart. I love the shadows he creates with his lighting too. The use of high contrast also reflects my designs at the moment.

The second is again a great use of contrast, but also depth.

This has given me the idea to maybe keep the design I’ve got for the cover as part of the house style, by blending two images into one and maybe adjusting the contrast/hue. 

This is the work of David Stewart.

I’ve looked at this work to suit the magazine because of Stewart’s use of colour. Most of the photographs that are on D&AD seem to have the same reduced hue and slightly lower contrast than what I would expect from a just-taken image.

The second image to me looks like a lithograph, in the kind of style of Abram Games with the solid, bold background.

I think that this simple edit would suit Silo as it has the colours to suit the art-y side of the magazine but the subdued appearance would help it to keep it’s serious feel as weakened hues and even black and white are often associated with serious subject matter.

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I looked at the connotations of authority, insight, intelligence, learning and wisdom for Western Europe/America and Eastern Europe.

The only colours that returned were black and blue.

So, I’m in pretty much the exact same spot as I was before. I’ll have to just see what colours look good.

For the ASFI logo, I want to try and avoid using the standard colours of the EU as I don’t want it to be to generic. I’m going to use this colour wheel to see what colours mean in European cultures to see what I could use.

For the ASFI logo, I want to try and avoid using the standard colours of the EU as I don’t want it to be to generic. I’m going to use this colour wheel to see what colours mean in European cultures to see what I could use.

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So for my app I’m changing the page numbers in the contents pages to article numbers.

They’ll feature in the printed magazine as well, at the top of the page with the page numbers still being at the bottom.

I’ve realised that if each of the articles is its own separate entity in the app (i.e., no page-changing) then what would I do if there is more than one article on a page in the printed version? That’s what I’m recreating so I don’t want it to be confusing.

Article numbers would help to avoid this confusion.

These article numbers will now feature in the contents pages instead of page numbers. This will be to aid users’ memories as to where they saw something that may have interested them, as well as making favourite-ing articles an easier process. They will also appear at the top of an article once one has been chosen from the contents but will not be fixed in place, so that most room is left available for body text.

I’m going to use this for my basic digital layouts when it comes to button and title placement.

I’m going to use this for my basic digital layouts when it comes to button and title placement.

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  1. When abuse ends, a life begins.
  2. Protection. Prevention. Persecution.
  3. You can make it go away.
  4. Lift the weight from thousands of shoulders.
  5. Be the light that eradicates shadows.

These are the slogans I’ve thought of for the Safeguarding project. Would much appreciate some feedback. Which one do you guys think is best?

I quite like these STOP posters for Lincolnshire schools. It’s quite clever how they’ve used the same letters to create different messages.